Current Lab Members


 

James V. Green
Doctoral Candidate

Email: jimmy.v.green@gmail.com

 

 

 

Education

Northeastern University, Boston, MA
Candidate for Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering (Expected: Spring 2011)
Thesis: “Size- and Adhesion-Based Microfluidic Cell Separation for Tissue Engineering and Clinical Diagnostics”

University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
B.S. Chemical Engineering, 2007

Research

“Microfluidic Cell Separation for Cardiac Tissue Engineering”

Myocardial infarction is a condition that affects more than 7 million individuals in the United States.  Conventional therapies are limited by the inability of the myocardium to regenerate after injury and the shortage of organs for transplantation.  A novel alternative to conventional therapies is the in vitro cultivation of cell-based cardiac grafts that can be surgically attached to the myocardium. The native myocardium (cardiac muscle) is a highly differentiated tissue composed of cardiac myocytes and several other cell types (mostly fibroblasts) along with a dense supporting vasculature and a collagen-based extracellular matrix.  Recent reports have indicated that a small number of resident cardiac progenitor cells are also present in the myocardium.  Cardiac myocytes, when harvested from the myocardium, can be used to construct cardiac tissue.  Cardiac progenitor cells, whose role is not completely understood at this time, are expected to play an important role in cell-based myocardial repair as well as in cardiac tissue engineering.  The major goal of this project is the design and fabrication of microfluidic devices that are capable of isolating important cardiac cell subpopulations, specifically cardiomyocytes and undifferentiated cardiac progenitor cells, with high purity.

“Microfluidic Immunophenotyping Device for the Diagnosis of Uveitis and Ocular Cancer”

The objective of this project is to create a microfluidic platform capable of characterizing the cellular and cytokine content of vitreous humor. This platform will be of direct benefit to patients suffering from uveitis or primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) who need to undergo surgical removal of the vitreous humor (vitreous biopsy) as a means of obtaining a detailed diagnosis of these diseases. A detailed diagnosis is critical for the early detection of PIOL as well as for identifying targeted therapeutic drugs to treat uveitis.  The current approach to analyzing the vitreous biopsy product consists of analysis by a skilled pathologist and flow cytometry. The current approach is limited in its efficacy for two reasons: (1) a large number of cells must typically be present in the sample for both the pathologic and flow cytometry analysis, and (2) the cells typically present in the biopsy sample are fragile and are often damaged in transit between the clinic and analytical laboratories. Indeed, the ‘diagnostic yield,’ which is the proportion of samples from which a conclusive diagnosis can be made, is only around 15% for flow cytometry, as reported in a recent study. The proposed microfluidic approach will be a valuable alternative to the current approach because of its ability to handle small and large sample volumes, immunophenotype cells with the resolution of individual cells, and quantitatively detect small (attomolar) quantities of cytokines.

Publications

J.V. Green, M. Radisic, and S.K. Murthy. “Deterministic Lateral Displacement as a Means to Enrich Large Cells for Tissue Engineering,” Analytical Chemistry 2009, 81, 9178-9182.

J.V. Green and S.K. Murthy. “Microfluidic Enrichment of a Target Cell Type from a Heterogenous Suspension by Adhesion-Based Negative Selection,” Lab on a Chip 2009, 9, 2245-2248.

J.V. Green, T. Kniazeva, M. Abedi, D. Sokhey, M.E. Taslim, and S.K. Murthy. “Effect of Channel Geometry on Cell Adhesion in Microfluidic Devices,” Lab on a Chip 2009, 9, 677-685.

Published Proceedings

J.V. Green , Dawei Sun, Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Kameran Lashkari and Shashi K. Murthy. “Microfluidic ELISA for Ocular Diagnostics.” 14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (µTAS 2010). (presented on October 3, 2010 in  Groningen, Netherlands)

B.D. Plouffe, J.V. Green, and S.K. Murthy (invited presenter). “Microfluidic Cell Separation: Applications and Challenges in Tissue Engineering.” Proceedings of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), 2010, 7593, P1-10.

Presentations

J.V. Green, Dawei Sun, Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Kameran Lashkari and Shashi K. Murthy. “Microfluidic ELISA for Ocular Diagnostics.” Microtas 2010, Groningen, The Netherlands. October 3, 2010.

J.V. Green, and S.K. Murthy, “Microfluidic ELISA for Ocular Diagnostics.” Material Research Society 2010 Spring Meeting, San Francisco, CA, April 5-9, 2010.

J.V. Green, M. Radisic, and S.K. Murthy, “Peptide-Functionalized Surfaces in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Separation by Negative Selection.” Materials Research Society 2009 Spring Meeting, San Francisco, CA, April 6-10, 2009.

J.V. Green, T. Kniazeva, M. Abedi, D. Sokhey, M.E. Taslim, and S.K. Murthy. “Effect of Device Geometry on Cell Adhesion in Microfluidic Devices.” Graduate Materials Links, Boston, MA. February 20, 2009.

J.V. Green and S.K. Murthy. “Effect of Microchannel Geometry in a Cell-Affinity Chromatography Process.” 23rd International Symposium on Microscale Bioseparations, Boston, MA. February 4, 2009.

J.V. Green and S.K. Murthy. “Adhesion-Based Microfluidic Cell Separation.” Northeastern University Research and Scholarship Expo, Boston, MA. March 26, 2009.

J.V. Green, M. Radisic, and S.K. Murthy. “Microfluidic Cell Separation for Tissue Engineering and Cell-Based Regenerative Therapeutics.” Center for Integration of Medicine & Innovative Technology (CIMIT) Innovation Congress 2008, Boston, MA. October 28-29, 2008.

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